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“WandaVision: The Complete Series” 4K, Blu-Ray Review

 

One of the many highlights of The Marvels was getting to spend more time with Monica Rambeau, the grown-up version of “Lieutenant Trouble” from Captain Marvel. But it wasn’t the first time we had the pleasure, as the adult Monica was actually introduced in the Disney+ show WandaVision.

Newly available on 4K and Blu-ray, WandaVision: The Complete Series presents all 9 episodes of this engaging and inventive show, as well as some cool extras. Which makes it as good for people who loved it on Disney+ as those who haven’t had the pleasure.

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Books Comics

Exclusive Interview: “Miles Davis And The Search For The Sound” Writer / Artist Dave Chisholm

 

Miles Davis (1926-1991) was one of the greatest jazz trumpeters and composers of all time. But his turbulent life was almost as interesting as his music.

Now that life is being shared, and in grand visual style, courtesy of Dave Chisholm’s new graphic novel biography Miles Davis And The Search For The Sound (hardcover). In the following email interview, Chisholm discusses what went into this book, including how his own skills on the trumpet made it that much better.

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Books Comics

Exclusive Interview: “Marvel Zombies: The Hunger” Author Marsheila Rockwell

 

People love superheroes, and people love zombies. So, by the transitive property, people love zombie superheroes. Or you could just consider how both Marvel and DC have told zombie stories, with the former even incorporating them into their recent animated show What If?

Now, people who love zombie superheroes can get their fix without all those pesky illustrations thanks to Marsheila Rockwell’s new superheroic horror novel Marvel Zombies: The Hunger (paperback, Kindle). In the following email interview, Rockwell discusses what inspired and influenced this story, as well as how it connects to Marvel’s comics, What If?, and the other Marvel novels published by Aconyte.

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Comics PlayStation 5 Reviews Video Games

Marvel’s Spider-Man 2″ Video Game Review (PS5)

 

Since his first appearance in 1962’s Amazing Fantasy #15, Spider-Man has been shot, stabbed, poisoned, punched, kicked, cloned, married, teamed with an alien symbiote, joined nearly every superhero team in the Marvel universe, and had more adventures than anyone could possibly have in sixty-one years unless they were also a fictional character on a monthly schedule.

And yet, the core of the character remains the same. He’s a person, with foibles, failings, and feelings; he swings from a web with the greatest of ease; he’s strong, and he can kick; and he always tries to do the right thing.

It’s why I wasn’t bothered that Marvel’s Spider-Man 2 (PlayStation 5) isn’t all that different from Spidey’s previous games — 2018’s Marvel’s Spider-Man and 2020’s Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales — since that means it’s just as much fun.

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Books Comics

Exclusive Interview: “Heart Attack” Writer Shawn Kittelsen & Artist Eric Zawadzki

 

It doesn’t matter how or why, but if you’re different in this world, someone will hate you for it. Just ask anyone who isn’t straight, white, cisgender, native to the country they’re living in… Or, if you prefer, ask Jill and Charlie from the graphic novel Heart Attack (paperback, Kindle), in which gene therapy inadvertently leads to some people to have special abilities, and thus being the targets of bigotry from a government that fears them. In the following email interview, Heart Attack writer Shawn Kittelsen and artist Eric Zawadzki discuss how this comic book came together.

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Books Comics

Exclusive Interview: “Mockingbird: Strike Out” Author Maria Lewis

 

Like many female characters in fiction, the Marvel Comics character Mockingbird has often been defined more by what male character she was standing next to than by her own abilities or adventures. It’s something writer Maria Lewis was not only well aware of when she started writing the novel Mockingbird: Strike Out (paperback, Kindle), but — as she explains in the following email interview — also something she was determined not to do.

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Books Comics

Exclusive Interview: “Wastelanders: Star-Lord” Writer Sarah Cawkwell

 

Written by noted comic book scribe Benjamin Percy, Wastelanders: Star-Lord was originally presented as a 10 episode audio drama with The West Wing‘s Timothy Busfield voicing Peter Quill / Star-Lord, Groundhog Day‘s Chris Elliot as Rocket Racoon, and Ugly Betty‘s Vanessa Williams as Emma Frost.

But some people prefer to read stories themselves. It is for them that we present the following email interview with writer Sarah Cawkwell, who adapted Percy’s original script into the new novel Wastelanders: Star-Lord (paperback, Kindle).

In this Q&A, Cawkwell discusses how she got this plum gig, and what it took to convert the script into a novel.

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Books Comics

Exclusive Interview: “School Of X: The Phoenix Chase” Author Neil Kleid

 

It’s funny to look back at the first Iron Man movie and think how that character got his own movie when he wasn’t as well-known as Spider-Man or Superman. But every character has to start somewhere. Which is what I was thinking when editing the following email interview with writer Neil Kleid about his new novel School Of X: The Phoenix Chase (paperback, Kindle), an X-Men novel about the mutant Kid Omega. Who? you might ask…for now…

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Books Comics

Exclusive Interview: “Bea Wolf” Author Zach Weinersmith

 

The epic poem “Beowulf” has been adapted and reworked in numerous ways over the years. Neil Gaiman, for instance, not only cowrote the screenplay for the animated movie, but he also wrote his own poetic version, called “Bay Wolf” (from his collection Smoke And Mirrors), as well as a modernized novella titled The Monarch Of The Glenn (from his collection Fragile Things). And now writer Zach Weinersmith is retelling the tale — but with (and for) kids — in his new comic adaptation Bea Wolf (hardcover, Kindle). Though as he explains in the following email interview, he uses the word “kids” rather loosely.